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Algebra: Chapter 0
Paolo AluffiAlgebra: Chapter 0 is a self-contained introduction to the main topics of algebra, suitable for a first sequence on the subject at the beginning graduate or upper undergraduate level. The primary distinguishing feature of the book, compared to standard textbooks in algebra, is the early introduction of categories, used as a unifying theme in the presentation of the main topics. A second feature consists of an emphasis on homological algebra: basic notions on complexes are presented as soon as modules have been introduced, and an extensive last chapter on homological algebra can form the basis for a follow-up introductory course on the subject. Approximately 1,000 exercises both provide adequate practice to consolidate the understanding of the main body of the text and offer the opportunity to explore many other topics, including applications to number theory and algebraic geometry. This will allow instructors to adapt the textbook to their specific choice of topics and provide the independent reader with a richer exposure to algebra. Many exercises include substantial hints, and navigation of the topics is facilitated by an extensive index and by hundreds of cross-references.
Compact Complex Surfaces
W. Barth, K. Hulek, Chris Peters, A.van de VenIn the 19 years which passed since the first edition was published, several important developments have taken place in the theory of surfaces. The most sensational one concerns the differentiable structure of surfaces. Twenty years ago very little was known about differentiable structures on 4-manifolds, but in the meantime Donaldson on the one hand and Seiberg and Witten on the other hand, have found, inspired by gauge theory, totally new invariants. Strikingly, together with the theory explained in this book these invariants yield a wealth of new results about the differentiable structure of algebraic surfaces. Other developments include the systematic use of nef-divisors (in ac- cordance with the progress made in the classification of higher dimensional algebraic varieties), a better understanding of Kahler structures on surfaces, and Reider's new approach to adjoint mappings. All these developments have been incorporated in the present edition, though the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten theory only by way of examples. Of course we use the opportunity to correct some minor mistakes, which we ether have discovered ourselves or which were communicated to us by careful readers to whom we are much obliged.
Complex Algebraic Surfaces
Arnaud BeauvilleThe classification of algebraic surfaces is an intricate and fascinating branch of mathematics, developed over more than a century and still an active area of research today. In this book, Professor Beauville gives a lucid and concise account of the subject, expressed simply in the language of modern topology and sheaf theory, and accessible to any budding geometer. A chapter on preliminary material ensures that this volume is self-contained while the exercises succeed both in giving the flavor of the classical subject, and in equipping the reader with the techniques needed for research. The book is aimed at graduate students in geometry and topology.
A Panoramic View of Riemannian Geometry
Marcel BergerThis book introduces readers to the living topics of Riemannian Geometry and details the main results known to date. The results are stated without detailed proofs but the main ideas involved are described, affording the reader a sweeping panoramic view of almost the entirety of the field.

From the reviews "The book has intrinsic value for a student as well as for an experienced geometer. Additionally, it is really a compendium in Riemannian Geometry." —MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS
Complex Abelian Varieties
Christina Birkenhake, Herbert LangeThis book explores the theory of abelian varieties over the field of complex numbers, explaining both classic and recent results in modern language. The second edition adds five chapters on recent results including automorphisms and vector bundles on abelian varieties, algebraic cycles and the Hodge conjecture. ". . . far more readable than most . . . it is also much more complete." Olivier Debarre in Mathematical Reviews, 1994.
Introduction to Algebra
Peter J. CameronDeveloped to meet the needs of modern students, this Second Edition of the classic algebra text by Peter Cameron covers all the abstract algebra an undergraduate student is likely to need. Starting with an introductory overview of numbers, sets and functions, matrices, polynomials, and modular arithmetic, the text then introduces the most important algebraic structures: groups, rings and fields, and their properties. This is followed by coverage of vector spaces and modules with applications to abelian groups and canonical forms before returning to the construction of the number systems, including the existence of transcendental numbers. The final chapters take the reader further into the theory of groups, rings and fields, coding theory, and Galois theory. With over 300 exercises, and web-based solutions, this is an ideal introductory text for Year 1 and 2 undergraduate students in mathematics.
Números: uma Introdução à Matemática
César Polcino Milies, Sonia Pitta Coelho
Sphere Packings, Lattices and Groups
John Conway, Neil J. A. SloaneThe third edition of this definitive and popular book continues to pursue the question: what is the most efficient way to pack a large number of equal spheres in n-dimensional Euclidean space? The authors also examine such related issues as the kissing number problem, the covering problem, the quantizing problem, and the classification of lattices and quadratic forms. There is also a description of the applications of these questions to other areas of mathematics and science such as number theory, coding theory, group theory, analogue-to-digital conversion and data compression, n-dimensional crystallography, dual theory and superstring theory in physics. New and of special interest is a report on some recent developments in the field, and an updated and enlarged supplementary bibliography with over 800 items.
Che cos'è la matematica?
Herbert Robbins Richard Courant
Mirror Symmetry and Algebraic Geometry
David A. CoxMirror symmetry began when theoretical physicists made some astonishing predictions about rational curves on quintic hypersurfaces in four-dimensional projective space. Understanding the mathematics behind these predictions has been a substantial challenge. This book is the first completely comprehensive monograph on mirror symmetry, covering the original observations by the physicists through the most recent progress made to date. Subjects discussed include toric varieties, Hodge theory, Kähler geometry, moduli of stable maps, Calabi-Yau manifolds, quantum cohomology, Gromov-Witten invariants, and the mirror theorem.
Higher-Dimensional Algebraic Geometry
Olivier DebarreThe classification theory of algebraic varieties is the focus of this book. This very active area of research is still developing, but an amazing quantity of knowledge has accumulated over the past twenty years. The authors goal is to provide an easily accessible introduction to the subject. The book starts with preparatory and standard definitions and results, then moves on to discuss various aspects of the geometry of smooth projective varieties with many rational curves, and finishes in taking the first steps towards Moris minimal model program of classification of algebraic varieties by proving the cone and contraction theorems. The book is well-organized and the author has kept the number of concepts that are used but not proved to a minimum to provide a mostly self-contained introduction.
The Geometry of Schemes
David Eisenbud, Joe HarrisGrothendieck’s beautiful theory of schemes permeates modern algebraic geometry and underlies its applications to number theory, physics, and applied mathematics. This simple account of that theory emphasizes and explains the universal geometric concepts behind the definitions. In the book, concepts are illustrated with fundamental examples, and explicit calculations show how the constructions of scheme theory are carried out in practice.
Algebraic Surfaces and Holomorphic Vector Bundles
Robert FriedmanA novel feature of the book is its integrated approach to algebraic surface theory and the study of vector bundle theory on both curves and surfaces. While the two subjects remain separate through the first few chapters, they become much more tightly interconnected as the book progresses. Thus vector bundles over curves are studied to understand ruled surfaces, and then reappear in the proof of Bogomolov's inequality for stable bundles, which is itself applied to study canonical embeddings of surfaces via Reider's method. Similarly, ruled and elliptic surfaces are discussed in detail, before the geometry of vector bundles over such surfaces is analysed. Many of the results on vector bundles appear for the first time in book form, backed by many examples, both of surfaces and vector bundles, and over 100 exercises forming an integral part of the text. Aimed at graduates with a thorough first-year course in algebraic geometry, as well as more advanced students and researchers in the areas of algebraic geometry, gauge theory, or 4-manifold topology, many of the results on vector bundles will also be of interest to physicists studying string theory.
Representation Theory: A First Course
William Fulton, Joe HarrisIntroducing finite-dimensional representations of Lie groups and Lie algebras, this example-oriented book works from representation theory of finite groups, through Lie groups and Lie algrbras to the finite dimensional representations of the classical groups.
Basic Quadratic Forms
Larry J. GersteinThe arithmetic theory of quadratic forms is a rich branch of number theory that has had important applications to several areas of pure mathematics—particularly group theory and topology—as well as to cryptography and coding theory. This book is a self-contained introduction to quadratic forms that is based on graduate courses the author has taught many times. It leads the reader from foundation material up to topics of current research interest—with special attention to the theory over the integers and over polynomial rings in one variable over a field—and requires only a basic background in linear and abstract algebra as a prerequisite. Whenever possible, concrete constructions are chosen over more abstract arguments. The book includes many exercises and explicit examples, and it is appropriate as a textbook for graduate courses or for independent study. To facilitate further study, a guide to the extensive literature on quadratic forms is provided.
Algebraic Geometry: Part I: Schemes. With Examples and Exercises
Ulrich Görtz, Torsten WedhornThis book introduces the reader to modern algebraic geometry. It presents Grothendieck's technically demanding language of schemes that is the basis of the most important developments in the last fifty years within this area. A systematic treatment and motivation of the theory is emphasized, using concrete examples to illustrate its usefulness. Several examples from the realm of Hilbert modular surfaces and of determinantal varieties are used methodically to discuss the covered techniques. Thus the reader experiences that the further development of the theory yields an ever better understanding of these fascinating objects. The text is complemented by many exercises that serve to check the comprehension of the text, treat further examples, or give an outlook on further results. The volume at hand is an introduction to schemes. To get startet, it requires only basic knowledge in abstract algebra and topology. Essential facts from commutative algebra are assembled in an appendix. It will be complemented by a second volume on the cohomology of schemes.
Principles of Algebraic Geometry
Phillip Griffiths, Joseph HarrisA comprehensive, self-contained treatment presenting general results of the theory. Establishes a geometric intuition and a working facility with specific geometric practices. Emphasizes applications through the study of interesting examples and the development of computational tools. Coverage ranges from analytic to geometric. Treats basic techniques and results of complex manifold theory, focusing on results applicable to projective varieties, and includes discussion of the theory of Riemann surfaces and algebraic curves, algebraic surfaces and the quadric line complex as well as special topics in complex manifolds.
Symmetric and Alternating Groups As Monodromy Groups of Riemann Surfaces 1: Generic Covers and Covers With Many Branch Points
Robert M. Guralnick, John ShareshianThe authors consider indecomposable degree $n$ covers of Riemann surfaces with monodromy group an alternating or symmetric group of degree $d$. They show that if the cover has five or more branch points then the genus grows rapidly with $n$ unless either $d = n$ or the curves have genus zero, there are precisely five branch points and $n =d(d-1)/2$. Similarly, if there is a totally ramified point, then without restriction on the number of branch points the genus grows rapidly with $n$ unless either $d=n$ or the curves have genus zero and $n=d(d-1)/2$. One consequence of these results is that if $f:X \rightarrow \mathbb{P 1$ is indecomposable of degree $n$ with $X$ the generic Riemann surface of genus $g \ge 4$, then the monodromy group is $S n$ or $A n$ (and both can occur for $n$ sufficiently large). The authors also show if that if $f(x)$ is an indecomposable rational function of degree $n$ branched at $9$ or more points, then its monodromy group is $A n$ or $S n$.Finally, they answer a question of Elkies by showing that the curve parameterizing extensions of a number field given by an irreducible trinomial with Galois group $H$ has large genus unless $H=A n$ or $S n$ or $n$ is very small.
Algebraic Geometry: A First Course
Joe Harris"This book succeeds brilliantly by concentrating on a number of core topics...and by treating them in a hugely rich and varied way. The author ensures that the reader will learn a large amount of classical material and perhaps more importantly, will also learn that there is no one approach to the subject. The essence lies in the range and interplay of possible approaches. The author is to be congratulated on a work of deep and enthusiastic scholarship." —MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS
Moduli of Curves
Joe Harris, Ian MorrisonA guide to a rich and fascinating subject: algebraic curves and how they vary in families. Providing a broad but compact overview of the field, this book is accessible to readers with a modest background in algebraic geometry. It develops many techniques, including Hilbert schemes, deformation theory, stable reduction, intersection theory, and geometric invariant theory, with the focus on examples and applications arising in the study of moduli of curves. From such foundations, the book goes on to show how moduli spaces of curves are constructed, illustrates typical applications with the proofs of the Brill-Noether and Gieseker-Petri theorems via limit linear series, and surveys the most important results about their geometry ranging from irreducibility and complete subvarieties to ample divisors and Kodaira dimension. With over 180 exercises and 70 figures, the book also provides a concise introduction to the main results and open problems about important topics which are not covered in detail.
Algebraic Geometry
Robin HartshorneAn introduction to abstract algebraic geometry, with the only prerequisites being results from commutative algebra, which are stated as needed, and some elementary topology. More than 400 exercises distributed throughout the book offer specific examples as well as more specialised topics not treated in the main text, while three appendices present brief accounts of some areas of current research. This book can thus be used as textbook for an introductory course in algebraic geometry following a basic graduate course in algebra.
Robin Hartshorne studied algebraic geometry with Oscar Zariski and David Mumford at Harvard, and with J.-P. Serre and A. Grothendieck in Paris. He is the author of "Residues and Duality", "Foundations of Projective Geometry", "Ample Subvarieties of Algebraic Varieties", and numerous research titles.
Algebraic Topology
Allen HatcherIn most major universities one of the three or four basic first-year graduate mathematics courses is algebraic topology. This introductory text is suitable for use in a course on the subject or for self-study, featuring broad coverage and a readable exposition, with many examples and exercises. The four main chapters present the basics: fundamental group and covering spaces, homology and cohomology, higher homotopy groups, and homotopy theory generally. The author emphasizes the geometric aspects of the subject, which helps students gain intuition. A unique feature is the inclusion of many optional topics not usually part of a first course due to time constraints: Bockstein and transfer homomorphisms, direct and inverse limits, H-spaces and Hopf algebras, the Brown representability theorem, the James reduced product, the Dold-Thom theorem, and Steenrod squares and powers.
Diophantine Geometry: An Introduction
Marc Hindry, Joseph H. SilvermanThis is an introduction to diophantine geometry at the advanced graduate level. The book contains a proof of the Mordell conjecture which will make it quite attractive to graduate students and professional mathematicians. In each part of the book, the reader will find numerous exercises.
Mirror Symmetry
Kentaro Hori, Sheldon Katz, Albrecht Klemm, Rahul Pandharipande, Richard Thomas, Cumrun Vafa, Ravi Vakil, Eric ZaslowThis thorough and detailed exposition is the result of an intensive month-long course sponsored by the Clay Mathematics Institute. It develops mirror symmetry from both mathematical and physical perspectives. The material will be particularly useful for those wishing to advance their understanding by exploring mirror symmetry at the interface of mathematics and physics.

This one-of-a-kind volume offers the first comprehensive exposition on this increasingly active area of study. It is carefully written by leading experts who explain the main concepts without assuming too much prerequisite knowledge. The book is an excellent resource for graduate students and research mathematicians interested in mathematical and theoretical physics.
Reflection Groups and Coxeter Groups
James E. HumphreysIn this graduate textbook Professor Humphreys presents a concrete and up-to-date introduction to the theory of Coxeter groups. He assumes that the reader has a good knowledge of algebra, but otherwise the book is self contained. The first part is devoted to establishing concrete examples; the author begins by developing the most important facts about finite reflection groups and related geometry, and showing that such groups have a Coxeter representation. In the next chapter these groups are classified by Coxeter diagrams, and actual realizations of these groups are discussed. Chapter 3 discusses the polynomial invariants of finite reflection groups, and the first part ends with a description of the affine Weyl groups and the way they arise in Lie theory. The second part (which is logically independent of, but motivated by, the first) starts by developing the properties of the Coxeter groups. Chapter 6 shows how earlier examples and others fit into the general classification of Coxeter diagrams. Chapter 7 is based on the very important work of Kazhdan and Lusztig and the last chapter presents a number of miscellaneous topics of a combinatorial nature.
Complex Geometry: An Introduction
Daniel HuybrechtsEasily accessible

Includes recent developments

Assumes very little knowledge of differentiable manifolds and functional analysis

Particular emphasis on topics related to mirror symmetry (SUSY, Kaehler-Einstein metrics, Tian-Todorov lemma)
Fourier-Mukai Transforms in Algebraic Geometry
Daniel HuybrechtsThis seminal text on Fourier-Mukai Transforms in Algebraic Geometry by a leading researcher and expositor is based on a course given at the Institut de Mathematiques de Jussieu in 2004 and 2005. Aimed at postgraduate students with a basic knowledge of algebraic geometry, the key aspect of this book is the derived category of coherent sheaves on a smooth projective variety. Including notions from other areas, e.g. singular cohomology, Hodge theory, abelian varieties, K3 surfaces; full proofs are given and exercises aid the reader throughout.
The Geometry of Moduli Spaces of Sheaves
Daniel Huybrechts, Manfred LehnNow back in print, this highly regarded book has been updated to reflect recent advances in the theory of semistable coherent sheaves and their moduli spaces, which include moduli spaces in positive characteristic, moduli spaces of principal bundles and of complexes, Hilbert schemes of points on surfaces, derived categories of coherent sheaves, and moduli spaces of sheaves on Calabi-Yau threefolds. The authors review changes in the field since the publication of the original edition in 1997 and point the reader towards further literature. References have been brought up to date and errors removed. Developed from the authors' lectures, this book is ideal as a text for graduate students as well as a valuable resource for any mathematician with a background in algebraic geometry who wants to learn more about Grothendieck's approach.
Number Theory 2: Introduction to Class Field Theory
K. KatoThis book, the second of three related volumes on number theory, is the English translation of the original Japanese book. Here, the idea of class field theory, a highlight in algebraic number theory, is first described with many concrete examples. A detailed account of proofs is thoroughly exposited in the final chapter. The authors also explain the local-global method in number theory, including the use of ideles and adeles. Basic properties of zeta and $L$-functions are established and used to prove the prime number theorem and the Dirichlet theorem on prime numbers in arithmetic progressions. With this book, the reader can enjoy the beauty of numbers and obtain fundamental knowledge of modern number theory. The translation of the first volume was published as Number Theory 1: Fermat's Dream, Translations of Mathematical Monographs (Iwanami Series in Modern Mathematics), vol. 186, American Mathematical Society, 2000.
Number Theory 1: Fermat's Dream
Kazuya Kato, Nobushige Kurokawa, Takeshi SaitoThis is the English translation of the original Japanese book. In this volume, "Fermat's Dream", core theories in modern number theory are introduced. Developments are given in elliptic curves, $p$-adic numbers, the $\zeta$-function, and the number fields. This work presents an elegant perspective on the wonder of numbers. Number Theory 2 on class field theory, and Number Theory 3 on Iwasawa theory and the theory of modular forms, are forthcoming in the series.
Introduzione alla topologia algebrica
Czes Kosniowski
Differential Geometry
Erwin Kreyszig, MathematicsAn introductory textbook on the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, presented in its simplest, most essential form, but with many explanatory details, figures and examples, and in a manner that conveys the theoretical and practical importance of the different concepts, methods and results involved. With problems at the end of each section, and solutions listed at the end of the book. Includes 99 illustrations.
Number Theory 3: Iwasawa Theory and Modular Forms
Nobushige Kurokawa, Masato Kurihara, Takeshi SaitoThis is the third of three related volumes on number theory. (The first two volumes were also published in the Iwanami Series in Modern Mathematics, as volumes 186 and 240.) The two main topics of this book are Iwasawa theory and modular forms. The presentation of the theory of modular forms starts with several beautiful relations discovered by Ramanujan and leads to a discussion of several important ingredients, including the zeta-regularized products, Kronecker's limit formula, and the Selberg trace formula. The presentation of Iwasawa theory focuses on the Iwasawa main conjecture, which establishes far-reaching relations between a p-adic analytic zeta function and a determinant defined from a Galois action on some ideal class groups. This book also contains a short exposition on the arithmetic of elliptic curves and the proof of Fermat's last theorem by Wiles. Together with the first two volumes, this book is a good resource for anyone learning or teaching modern algebraic number theory.
Algebra
Serge LangThis book is intended as a basic text for a one year course in algebra at the graduate level or as a useful reference for mathematicians and professionals who use higher-level algebra. This book successfully addresses all of the basic concepts of algebra. For the new edition, the author has added exercises and made numerous corrections to the text. From MathSciNet's review of the first edition: "The author has an impressive knack for presenting the important and interesting ideas of algebra in just the "right" way, and he never gets bogged down in the dry formalism which pervades some parts of algebra."
Topology: A Geometric Approach
Terry LawsonThis new-in-paperback introduction to topology emphasizes a geometric approach with a focus on surfaces. A primary feature is a large collection of exercises and projects, which fosters a teaching style that encourages the student to be an active class participant. A wide range of material at different levels supports flexible use of the book for a variety of students. Part I is appropriate for a one-semester or two-quarter course, and Part II (which is problem based) allows the book to be used for a year-long course which supports a variety of syllabuses.

The over 750 exercises range from simple checks of omitted details in arguments, to reinforce the material and increase student involvement, to the development of substantial theorems that have been broken into many steps. The style encourages an active student role. Solutions to selected exercises are included as an appendix, with solutions to all exercises available to the instructor on a companion website.
Introduction to Smooth Manifolds
John M. LeeAuthor has written several excellent Springer books. This book is a sequel to Introduction to Topological Manifolds; Careful and illuminating explanations, excellent diagrams and exemplary motivation; Includes short preliminary sections before each section explaining what is ahead and why
Riemannian Manifolds: An Introduction to Curvature
John M. LeeThis text focuses on developing an intimate acquaintance with the geometric meaning of curvature and thereby introduces and demonstrates all the main technical tools needed for a more advanced course on Riemannian manifolds. It covers proving the four most fundamental theorems relating curvature and topology: the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, the Cartan-Hadamard Theorem, Bonnet’s Theorem, and a special case of the Cartan-Ambrose-Hicks Theorem.
Algebraic Geometry and Arithmetic Curves
Qing LiuThis new-in-paperback edition provides a general introduction to algebraic and arithmetic geometry, starting with the theory of schemes, followed by applications to arithmetic surfaces and to the theory of reduction of algebraic curves. The first part introduces basic objects such as schemes, morphisms, base change, local properties (normality, regularity, Zariski's Main Theorem) This is followed by the more global aspect: coherent sheaves and a finiteness theorem for their cohomology groups. Then follows a chapter on sheaves of differentials, dualizing sheaves, and Grothendieck's duality theory. The first part ends with the theorem of Riemann-Roch and its application to the study of smooth projective curves over a field. Singular curves are treated through a detailed study of the Picard group. The second part starts with blowing-ups and desingularization (embedded or not) of fibered surfaces over a Dedekind ring that leads on to intersection theory on arithmetic surfaces. Castelnuovo's criterion is proved and also the existence of the minimal regular model. This leads to the study of reduction of algebraic curves. The case of elliptic curves is studied in detail. The book concludes with the fundamental theorem of stable reduction of Deligne-Mumford. This book is essentially self-contained, including the necessary material on commutative algebra. The prerequisites are few, and including many examples and approximately 600 exercises, the book is ideal for graduate students.
Introduction to the Mori Program
Kenji MatsukiMori's Program is a fusion of the so-called Minimal Model Program and the IItaka Program toward the biregular and/or birational classification of higher dimensional algebraic varieties. The author presents this theory in an easy and understandable way with lots of background motivation. Prerequisites are those covered in Hartshorne's book "Algebraic Geometry." This is the first book in this extremely important and active field of research and will become a key resource for graduate students wanting to get into the area.
Algebraic Curves and Riemann Surfaces
Rick MirandaIn this book, Miranda takes the approach that algebraic curves are best encountered for the first time over the complex numbers, where the reader's classical intuition about surfaces, integration, and other concepts can be brought into play. Therefore, many examples of algebraic curves are presented in the first chapters. In this way, the book begins as a primer on Riemann surfaces, with complex charts and meromorphic functions taking center stage. But the main examples come from projective curves, and slowly but surely the text moves toward the algebraic category. Proofs of the Riemann-Roch and Serre Duality Theorems are presented in an algebraic manner, via an adaptation of the adelic proof, expressed completely in terms of solving a Mittag-Leffler problem. Sheaves and cohomology are introduced as a unifying device in the latter chapters, so that their utility and naturalness are immediately obvious. Requiring a background of a one semester of complex variable! theory and a year of abstract algebra, this is an excellent graduate textbook for a second-semester course in complex variables or a year-long course in algebraic geometry.
Lectures on Kähler Geometry
Andrei MoroianuKähler geometry is a beautiful and intriguing area of mathematics, of substantial research interest to both mathematicians and physicists. This self-contained 2007 graduate text provides a concise and accessible introduction to the topic. The book begins with a review of basic differential geometry, before moving on to a description of complex manifolds and holomorphic vector bundles. Kähler manifolds are discussed from the point of view of Riemannian geometry, and Hodge and Dolbeault theories are outlined, together with a simple proof of the famous Kähler identities. The final part of the text studies several aspects of compact Kähler manifolds: the Calabi conjecture, Weitzenböck techniques, Calabi-Yau manifolds, and divisors. All sections of the book end with a series of exercises and students and researchers working in the fields of algebraic and differential geometry and theoretical physics will find that the book provides them with a sound understanding of this theory.
An Introduction to Invariants and Moduli
Shigeru MukaiIncorporated in this volume are the first two books in Mukai's series on Moduli Theory. The notion of a moduli space is central to geometry. However, its influence is not confined there; for example, the theory of moduli spaces is a crucial ingredient in the proof of Fermat's last theorem. Researchers and graduate students working in areas ranging from Donaldson or Seiberg-Witten invariants to more concrete problems such as vector bundles on curves will find this to be a valuable resource. Among other things this volume includes an improved presentation of the classical foundations of invariant theory that, in addition to geometers, would be useful to those studying representation theory. This translation gives an accurate account of Mukai's influential Japanese texts.
Geometric Invariant Theory
David Mumford, John Fogarty, Frances KirwanThis standard reference on applications of invariant theory to the construction of moduli spaces is a systematic exposition of the geometric aspects of classical theory of polynomial invariants. This new, revised edition is completely updated and enlarged with an additional chapter on the moment map by Professor Frances Kirwan. It includes a fully updated bibliography of work in this area.
Algebraic Geometry: An Introduction
Daniel PerrinAimed primarily at graduate students and beginning researchers, this book provides an introduction to algebraic geometry that is particularly suitable for those with no previous contact with the subject; it assumes only the standard background of undergraduate algebra. The book starts with easily-formulated problems with non-trivial solutions and uses these problems to introduce the fundamental tools of modern algebraic geometry: dimension; singularities; sheaves; varieties; and cohomology. A range of exercises is provided for each topic discussed, and a selection of problems and exam papers are collected in an appendix to provide material for further study.
Lie Groups: An Introduction through Linear Groups
Wulf RossmannThis book is an introduction to the theory of Lie groups and their representations at the advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate level. It covers the essentials of the subject starting from basic undergraduate mathematics. The correspondence between linear Lie groups and Lie algebras is developed in its local and global aspects. The classical groups are analyzed in detail, first with elementary matrix methods, then with the help of the structural tools typical of the theory of semisimple groups, such as Cartan subgroups, root, weights and reflections. The fundamental groups of the classical groups are worked out as an application of these methods. Manifolds are introduced when needed, in connection with homogeneous spaces, and the elements of differential and integral calculus on manifolds are presented, with special emphasis on integration on groups and homogeneous spaces. Representation theory starts from first principles, such as Schur's lemma and its consequences, and proceeds from there to the Peter-Weyl theorem, Weyl's character formula, and the Borel-Weil theorem, all in the context of linear groups.
Geometric Galois Actions: Volume 2, The Inverse Galois Problem, Moduli Spaces and Mapping Class Groups
Leila Schneps, Pierre LochakThis book surveys progress in the domains described in the hitherto unpublished manuscript "Esquisse d'un Programme" (Sketch of a Program) by Alexander Grothendieck. It will be of wide interest among workers in algebraic geometry, number theory, algebra and topology.
Lectures on Symplectic Geometry
Ana Cannas da SilvaThe goal of these notes is to provide a fast introduction to symplectic geometry for graduate students with some knowledge of differential geometry, de Rham theory and classical Lie groups.

This text addresses symplectomorphisms, local forms, contact manifolds, compatible almost complex structures, Kaehler manifolds, hamiltonian mechanics, moment maps, symplectic reduction and symplectic toric manifolds. It contains guided problems, called homework, designed to complement the exposition or extend the reader's understanding.

There are by now excellent references on symplectic geometry, a subset of which is in the bibliography of this book. However, the most efficient introduction to a subject is often a short elementary treatment, and these notes attempt to serve that purpose. This text provides a taste of areas of current research and will prepare the reader to explore recent papers and extensive books on symplectic geometry where the pace is much faster.

For this reprint numerous corrections and clarifications have been made, and the layout has been improved.
Algebraic Geometry 2: Sheaves and Cohomology
Kenji UenoModern algebraic geometry is built upon two fundamental notions: schemes and sheaves. The theory of schemes was explained in Algebraic Geometry 1: From Algebraic Varieties to Schemes, (see Volume 185 in the same series, Translations of Mathematical Monographs). In the present book, Ueno turns to the theory of sheaves and their cohomology. Loosely speaking, a sheaf is a way of keeping track of local information defined on a topological space, such as the local holomorphic functions on a complex manifold or the local sections of a vector bundle. To study schemes, it is useful to study the sheaves defined on them, especially the coherent and quasicoherent sheaves. The primary tool in understanding sheaves is cohomology. For example, in studying ampleness, it is frequently useful to translate a property of sheaves into a statement about its cohomology.

The text covers the important topics of sheaf theory, including types of sheaves and the fundamental operations on them, such as ...

coherent and quasicoherent sheaves.
proper and projective morphisms.
direct and inverse images.
Cech cohomology.

For the mathematician unfamiliar with the language of schemes and sheaves, algebraic geometry can seem distant. However, Ueno makes the topic seem natural through his concise style and his insightful explanations. He explains why things are done this way and supplements his explanations with illuminating examples. As a result, he is able to make algebraic geometry very accessible to a wide audience of non-specialists.
Algebraic Geometry 3: Further Study of Schemes
Kenji UenoAlgebraic geometry plays an important role in several branches of science and technology. This is the last of three volumes by Kenji Ueno algebraic geometry. This, in together with Algebraic Geometry 1 and Algebraic Geometry 2, makes an excellent textbook for a course in algebraic geometry.

In this volume, the author goes beyond introductory notions and presents the theory of schemes and sheaves with the goal of studying the properties necessary for the full development of modern algebraic geometry. The main topics discussed in the book include dimension theory, flat and proper morphisms, regular schemes, smooth morphisms, completion, and Zariski's main theorem. Ueno also presents the theory of algebraic curves and their Jacobians and the relation between algebraic and analytic geometry, including Kodaira's Vanishing Theorem.
Hodge Theory and Complex Algebraic Geometry I: Volume 1
Claire VoisinThis is a modern introduction to Kaehlerian geometry and Hodge structure. Coverage begins with variables, complex manifolds, holomorphic vector bundles, sheaves and cohomology theory (with the latter being treated in a more theoretical way than is usual in geometry). The book culminates with the Hodge decomposition theorem. In between, the author proves the Kaehler identities, which leads to the hard Lefschetz theorem and the Hodge index theorem. The second part of the book investigates the meaning of these results in several directions.
Hodge Theory and Complex Algebraic Geometry II: Volume 2
Claire VoisinThe second volume of this modern account of Kaehlerian geometry and Hodge theory starts with the topology of families of algebraic varieties. The main results are the generalized Noether-Lefschetz theorems, the generic triviality of the Abel-Jacobi maps, and most importantly, Nori's connectivity theorem, which generalizes the above. The last part deals with the relationships between Hodge theory and algebraic cycles. The text is complemented by exercises offering useful results in complex algebraic geometry. Also available: Volume I 0-521-80260-1 Hardback $60.00 C